What home inspectors don't check

From missing shingles to toilet flushes, the typical home inspector evaluates more than 1,600 features. Each item on their checklist is designed to help you decide if the home you’re considering is a good or bad investment.

However, the classic home inspection doesn’t include everything. The following four items are details a home inspector doesn’t automatically check.

Mold

Proving or disproving the existence of mold requires special equipment and laboratory testing. The same is true of radon and asbestos. It will cost you extra to test for these conditions and may require you to bring in a separate specialist.

Swimming Pool

While homes in the Seattle area don’t typically have swimming pools, some do. The basic home inspection will often include checking that the pool’s pump and heater are working. It doesn’t include looking at cracks or dents. This requires a professional pool inspector. Like all additional inspectors, this will cost extra. However, a faulty pool could cost you thousands of dollars to repair. So in the long run, it may be worth it.

Whatever’s Behind Heavy Furniture

When you pay for a basic home inspection, it doesn’t come with manual labor. If heavy furniture or other items are blocking certain areas of a home, the inspector isn’t going to move them. This means faulty electrical outlets and/or cracked walls may go unnoticed. Prior to an inspection, it’s best to ask the seller to move such items so the inspector can easily do their job.

Fireplace & Chimney

Typically, a home inspector will open and shut the dampers to make sure they are working. They may shine a flashlight up the chimney to check for large obstructions. Beyond that, you’ll need to bring in a fireplace and chimney specialist.


Have questions about whether or not your home inspection will impact your loan? Talk to a loan officer today.